Script for May 2000, QMH:

Welcome to Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT and this segment is called Queer Music Heritage. I'm JD Doyle and I'm here on the 4th Monday of each month to bring you a half-hour devoted to our culture's music. I plan to cover a lot of territory in terms of years and musical genres, and I try to give a little information about the music and artists as I go.

I'm going to start off the show with the song "Come Out Everybody," by an Irish duo called Zrazy. That's spelled zrazy. It's from their 1997 CD by the same name. I got to see them perform in New York last month and they are terrific. Their latest CD, called "Private Wars," is excellent jazz, very sexy stuff, and I highly recommend it. And, as this would have been the 70th birthday of Harvey Milk, I thought I'd use a very short quote by him to help introduce the song "come out everybody"

Harvey Milk quote
Zrazy - "Come Out Everybody"

Next up is a song by Alix Dobkin called "a woman's love". It's from her 1973 album "Lavender Jane Loves Women", one of the earliest openly lesbian albums. She is one of the pioneers of the women's music movement, and is still active politically and musically. Fortunately, her first two albums have been reissued on CD. And after that song, I'm going to take you way back, to 1928, to play one of the first openly lesbian songs.

Alix Dobkin - "A Woman's Love"
Ma Rainey - "Prove It On Me Blues"

Did you catch that line "went out last night with a crowd of my friends, they must have been women cause I don't like no men" ? That was Ma Rainey singing one of the earliest openly lesbian songs, from 1928. She was often referred to as the "mother of the blues."

Before I get to my spotlight artists, I want to take a quick break to remind you that this is Queer Music Heritage, a part of Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT, Houston. Now, please give a listen to this:

Romanovsky & Phillips - "Give Me A Homosexual"

Tonight I'm honoring the duo Romanovsky & Phillips. This group has always been special to me, as they were among the first openly gay artists that I became aware of. Their music was always fresh, and full of humor, but they were also able to deal effectively with serious subjects. Ron Romanovsky and Paul Phillips released their first album, called "I Thought You'd Be Taller" in 1984, and from it I'm playing "The Prince Charming Tango." And I'm following it with "what kind of self-respecting faggot am I", from their third album, "Trouble In Paradise," from 1986. Oh, yes, I opened up this spot with a bit of "Give Me A Homosexual" from their "Emotional Rollercoaster" album from 1988. Here are Romanovsky & Phillips.

Romanovsky & Phillips - "The Prince Charming Tango"
Romanovsky & Phillips - "What Kind Of Self-Respecting Faggot Am I?"

Romanovsky & Phillips released a total of 6 albums over a ten year period. They are all available at the Ladyslipper website, as is the Alix Dobkin CD I played a track from earlier. Now, I don't mean my show to sound like a commercial for Ladyslipper, but there are just so few reliable sources for the music of gay artists, and I do want the message to get across that some of the music I play is still available.

I'm closing this month's show with a very powerful ballad sung by Dan Martin from a cassette called "Human Being," that he and his lover Michael Biello released in 1992. They write terrific songs and were founders of an organization called Outmusic, which has branches in New York City and Philadelphia, designed to promote and encourage gay & lesbian artists. The song I picked has gone of to a life of its own, as it also appeared in an off-Broadway musical called "L'Amour Bleu" starring Tom Bogdan. Tom's version of the song got him a nomination at the Gay & Lesbian American Music Awards, the GLAMAs, last month, and I got to hear him sing it there. But I'm playing the original tonight, it's called "you don't know me". This is JD Doyle for Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT Houston, and I'll be back next month with a special gay pride installment of Queer Music Heritage, and, as promised, here is Dan Martin with "you don't know me".

Dan Martin - "you don't know me"


Script for June 2000, QMH:

Welcome to Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT and this segment is called Queer Music Heritage. I'm JD Doyle and I'm here on the 4th Monday of each month to bring you a half-hour devoted to our culture's music. I plan to cover a lot of territory in terms of years and types of music. Mostly, I just don't think gay and lesbian music of the past should be forgotten, and I try to give a little information about the music and artists as I go.

As this is gay pride month, all of this show is devoted to songs about Stonewall. There were quite a few songs on this subject and I'm not even able to play half of the ones in my collection in this short time, but I think I've picked some of the best.

In 1994, to commemorate the 25th anniversary of Stonewall, Tom Wilson Weinberg issued a 5-song CD of songs he wrote. I played a song by Tom on my March show, but on this CD he doesn't sing any of them. Instead, other artists are featured quite nicely. I'll start with a song called "Before Stonewall" by the NYC Gay Men's Chorus Chamber Choir, and then change the pace with "Bricks And Bottles" by Jan Tilley.

NYC Gay Men's Chamber Choir - "Before Stonewall"
Jan Tilley - "Brick's And Bottles"

Both those songs were from the CD "Don't Mess With Mary," from 1994. The next song is one I especially like. I not only like it musically, but because it represents how far-reaching the effect of Stonewall was. It was written by a folk singer from Australia named Peter Hicks, in 1993. I was just amazed to learn that an artist on the opposite side of the world would be so moved by an event here that happened when he was probably just a child. The song is called "Stonewall '69" and please excuse that we're going to have to edit out a couple words Peter used that are just not ready for radio.

Peter Hicks - "Stonewall '69"
Melinda D - "Remember Stonewall"

[Note: the above artist asked her last name be removed from my site]

That was Peter Hicks with "Stonewall '69" and I followed it with Melinda D singing "Remember Stonewall". I played one of her songs on my April show called "Lez-Be-Friends" and they are both from her delightful 1994 cassette release called "Dyke Dramas". I like her song "Remember Stonewall" because it pays tribute to the efforts toward gay rights of those who came before us.

I want to take a quick break to remind that this is Queer Music Heritage, a part of Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT, Houston.

I've got time for two more Stonewall songs, and they are among my favorites. The first is by Jallen Rix. His name is spelled j-a-l-l-e-n r-I-x. That's an uncommon name but he's a very talented artist. He's just come out with a very good new CD called "Time On A Chain" and you can find out more about him and hear sound clips of his music at his website at www.rixartz.com
The song I've chosen by him is called "I Saw Jesus Down At Stonewall," from his 1995 CD "The Sacred And The Queer", and there's even a video of it you can order from his site. As I mostly play older songs on my show, much of the material is no longer available, so I like to let people know when the music still can be found.

Here is Jallen Rix.

Jallen Rix - "I Saw Jesus Down At Stonewall"

My final song for this show is by an artist who goes by the name of Worm. In the fine print of his CD it says his name is Jimmy Worm, but only his last name appears on the cover. This song is also from 1995 and is called "Stonewall" and is from his CD "I Pledge". I think his CD is out of print, but if you ever see it you should grab it, as it's filled with very good, and very Out material….he is waaaay out of the closet with his lyrics, just the kind of stuff I love.

This is JD Doyle for Lesbian & Gay Voices on KPFT in Houston, finishing up my gay pride show and I'll be back next month with another installment of QMH, and now here's Worm singing "Stonewall"

Worm - "Stonewall"